substance abuse addiction treatment new jersey

The “Enough” Factor in the Brain

What separates an alcoholic from a normal drinker? The compulsion to drink despite negative consequences has baffled scientists, family members, spouses, and loved ones for centuries. How is it that two perfectly normal people, standing side by side, can consume alcohol and react in completely different ways? Even “normal” drinkers who drink heavily or binge drink do not experience the peculiar phenomena of craving as alcoholics do. Additionally, they have the simple ability that alcoholics do not: the ability to stop.

The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous explains that for the true alcoholic one is never enough. A common saying in recovery is that “one is too many, a thousand never enough.” The insatiable thrist for alcohol is unending in the alcoholic. Unique to addiction is the tendency to be lacking in a stopping limit, especially in consideraiton of negative consequences. It is the alcoholic who fools himself into believing he can have just one. “Cunning, baffling, powerful” is how The Big Book describes alcohol. Until now, alcoholics have been seen to be “powerless” over alcohol. While many argue this as a matter of willpower, AA sees it as a matter of spiritual malady. New research suggests that the alcoholic brain is actually deficient in a very important protein which helps with that “power”.

The “Enough” Factor in the Brain

PRDM2, according to inews, controls various nerve signals that help stop drinking. Meaning, that this protein is essential to having power over when enough is enough. The protein is located in the frontal lobes of the cortex, which is where the brain makes decisions. Specifically, PRDM2 manages how one nerve cell signals another. If there isn’t enough protein present, there will be ineffective communication about impulsivity among nerve cells.

The research found that in brains of alcoholics, PRDM2 was practically nonexistent. Not only does this impair the ability to stop drinking at any point, it also impairs the impulse to drink. Decision making about alcohol includes when and why to pick up alcohol in addition to how much. For example, active and present PRDM2 might contribute to avoiding a drink in times of stress. A better functioning frontal lobe means making more rational decisions.

Science continues to help destigmatize alcoholism and addiction. One day there might be a “cure” for the disease of addiction. Until that day, the more information gained, the greater treatment experiences we can provide.


substance abuse addiction treatment new jersey

The “Enough” Factor in the Brain

What separates an alcoholic from a normal drinker? The compulsion to drink despite negative consequences has baffled scientists, family members, spouses, and loved ones for centuries. How is it that two perfectly normal people, standing side by side, can consume alcohol and react in completely different ways? Even “normal” drinkers who drink heavily or binge drink do not experience the peculiar phenomena of craving as alcoholics do. Additionally, they have the simple ability that alcoholics do not: the ability to stop.

The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous explains that for the true alcoholic one is never enough. A common saying in recovery is that “one is too many, a thousand never enough.” The insatiable thrist for alcohol is unending in the alcoholic. Unique to addiction is the tendency to be lacking in a stopping limit, especially in consideraiton of negative consequences. It is the alcoholic who fools himself into believing he can have just one. “Cunning, baffling, powerful” is how The Big Book describes alcohol. Until now, alcoholics have been seen to be “powerless” over alcohol. While many argue this as a matter of willpower, AA sees it as a matter of spiritual malady. New research suggests that the alcoholic brain is actually deficient in a very important protein which helps with that “power”.

The “Enough” Factor in the Brain

PRDM2, according to inews, controls various nerve signals that help stop drinking. Meaning, that this protein is essential to having power over when enough is enough. The protein is located in the frontal lobes of the cortex, which is where the brain makes decisions. Specifically, PRDM2 manages how one nerve cell signals another. If there isn’t enough protein present, there will be ineffective communication about impulsivity among nerve cells.

The research found that in brains of alcoholics, PRDM2 was practically nonexistent. Not only does this impair the ability to stop drinking at any point, it also impairs the impulse to drink. Decision making about alcohol includes when and why to pick up alcohol in addition to how much. For example, active and present PRDM2 might contribute to avoiding a drink in times of stress. A better functioning frontal lobe means making more rational decisions.

Science continues to help destigmatize alcoholism and addiction. One day there might be a “cure” for the disease of addiction. Until that day, the more information gained, the greater treatment experiences we can provide.


Comprehending the Chakras

According to eastern philosophy, the body contains seven centers of spiritual and energetic power. These centers are referred to as chakras. Each chakra has an individual purpose and energy. Chakras can be opened or closed. An open chakra means the energy of that chakra and the holistic body can freely flow. When a chakra is closed, that energy is blocked. Energy that gets blocked can result in physical as well as psychological manifestations.

Ideally, as eastern preventative medicine practitioner would advocate, we should be in the flow all the time. Understanding the meanings associated with each chakra can help us understand where we might be blocked. Various treatment methods like reiki, massage, acupuncture and yoga can open the chakras, releasing their blocked energy. Mindfulness meditation can aid as well.

Why do chakras matter in recovery?

Recovering from drug and alcohol addiction, in addition to co-occurring disorders, is a healing process involving the full cooperation of mind, body, and spirit. Working with the chakras helps these three components be in open communication with one another. Recovery is also full of energetic releases found in profound moments of healing and growth. Like conduits or channels for energy, being able to focus on each chakra can support the movement of that energy. Drugs and alcohol are blockers. For a long time, it might have felt as though such harmful substances helped us be ourselves and be in tune with people around us. At the very neurobiological level of our brains, right down to the neurotransmitters, substances were preventing us from doing so. Choosing recovery, we choose to feel free in the natural flow of our own being again.

What are the chakras and where are they?

Each chakra has a color. Improving the strength of each chakra can be done with simple and fun color therapy. If you want to focus on opening a certain chakra, fill your space with that chakra’s color and embrace that particular energy with the intention of what the chakra means.

Root Chakra (red)- at the very base of our spine in the sit bones of our behind

Sacral Chakra (orange)- in our pelvic floor

Solar Plexus Chakra (yellow)- towards the top of our diaphragm

Heart Chakra (green)- in our chests

Throat Chakra (light blue)- in the base of our throats, where our voice box might be found

Third Eye Chakra (dark blue)- raised above the space between our eyebrows

Crown Chakra (purple)- the top of our head, or above our head

Enlightened Solutions knows that the deep connection between mind, body, and soul, is the ultimate source of healing and transformation when recovering from addiction to drugs and alcohol. Our program is rooted in 12 step philosophy and holistic healing practices. For more information please call 833-801-5483.